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Humanities

 

All undergraduate Students are required to take 11 units, six of which are core.
 

Core units

  1. HED 1101       Introduction to Critical Thinking
  2. HED 1102       Communication Skills I
  3. HED 1201       Philosophical Anthropology
  4. HED 1202       Communication Skills II
  5. HED 2101       Principles of Ethics
  6. HED 3201       Professional/Business Ethics

Compulsory Electives

(Students must pick two from this section)

  1. HHE 2105       Introduction to Philosophy/HHE 2106 Introduction to Theology
  2. HHE 3101       Social and Political Philosophy/HHE 3103 Introduction to Development Studies

Optional Electives

Students can take either a language elective or other humanities electives

 

Language Options

Students who choose this option must study one language at least up level four (4) 

  1. HLE 2101 French 1/HLE 2102 German 1//HLE 2103 Japanese 1/ HLE 2104 Spanish 1/HLE 2105 Chinese 1
  2. HLE 2201 French 2/HLE 2202 German 2/HLE 2203 Japanese 2//HLE 2204 Spanish 1/HLE 2205Chinese 2
  3. HLE 3101 French 3/HLE 3102 German 3/HLE 3103 Japanese 3/ HLE 3104 Spanish 2/HLE 3105Chinese 3
  4. HLE 3201 French 4/HLE 3202 German 4/ HLE 3203 Japanese 4/ HLE 3204 Spanish 4/ HLE 3205 Chinese 4
  5. HLE 4101 French 5/HLE 4102 German 5
  6. HLE 4201 French 6/ HLE 4202 German 6
  7. HLE 5101 French 7 /HLE 5102 German 7

Other Humanities Options

  1. HHE 2206       World Civilizations I
  2. HHE 3108       East African Societies
  3. HHE 3210       World Civilizations II
  4. HHE 3107       Great Books I
  5. HHE 3207       Great Books II

 

Distribution of the units


The 8 compulsory humanity units and the 4 humanity elective units are distributed over the four academic years. Note that this distribution is subject to change in the course of the year.

  

 

 

 FIRST SEMESTER

 

 SECOND SEMESTER

 

YEAR

ONE

 

 

- Communication Skills 1

- Introduction to Critical Thinking   

 

- Communication Skills 2

- Introduction to Critical Thinking

 

YEAR

TWO

- Philosophical Anthropology
- Development Studies
-Social and political philosophy
- (Elective 1)

- Philosophical Anthropology
- Development Studies
-Social and political philosophy
- (Elective 2) - ALL

 

YEAR THREE

- Principles of Ethics

- Social and Political Philosophy

- (Elective 3) - ALL

- Principles of Ethics

- Social and Political Philosophy     

- ( Elective 4) - ALL

YEAR

FOUR

- Business Ethics

- Business Ethics

  • The distributions of the compulsory units are shown in the order of the prerequisites. For example Communication Skills 1 is a prerequisite for Communication Skills 2. Philosophical Anthropology is a prerequisite for Principles of Ethics, etc.
  • The distribution of compulsory units may be subject to change when necessary.
  • All students should have completed the 8 compulsory humanity units and the 4 humanity electives by the end of their undergraduate course.
  • Exemption students should consult their respective faculties and the SHSS office regarding the number of compulsory units they need to take.

 

The 2 humanity elective paths are offered for four consecutive Semesters in 2nd and 3rd year.

  • This means that at the end of 3rd year, the regular students should have done 4 humanity elective units from either one or two of the humanity  options. The exemption students should also have done 4 humanity elective units by the end of their 4th year.
  • You may select an option from amongst the following:

(Please note that the SHSS office will state the languages and humanities on offer for each semester)

 

 

Language Option

 

Humanities Option

 

Students take four units of a language. A student chooses one language from the following: French, German, Japanese or Spanish.

  

Elective 1: Language (unit 1)

Elective 2: Language (unit 2)

Elective 3: Language (unit 3)

Elective 4: Language (unit 4)

 

 

 

Students who take this option will take the following electives:

  

Elective 1: Introduction to Philosophy or Introduction to theology

Elective 2: World Civilizations 1

Elective 3: Great Books 1 or  EAS*

Elective 4: Great Books 2 or

                  World Civilizations 2           

 

 

If a student takes all the 4 units of a certain language on offer i.e. either French, German, Japanese or Spanish,  this is equivalent to 4 humanity elective units

*EAS - East African Societies

 

Great Books 1 is a prerequisite for Great Books 2.

 

World Civilizations 1 is not a prerequisite for World Civilizations 2.


Note:

  • Students choose a humanity elective from the table above and progress from elective 1 to elective 2, etc, in each semester as indicated in the table on page 4.
  • In the Humanities Option, where there is a choice between 2 electives, the elective will only be available if the minimum number of students required to offer it is reached.

 

Course Descriptions

YEAR 1

 

HED 1101: Introduction to Critical Thinking

 

Purpose of the Course: To Introduce students to the art of deep and reflective reasoning

 

Intended Learning Outcomes   

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  1. Assess the way we use our mind to acquire and communicate knowledge.
  2. Evaluate concepts in a reasonable manner.
  3. Logically apply concepts to reality.
  4. Analyze and evaluate information critically.

Course Content

Critical thinking and the purpose of university education; critical thinking; art, science or wisdom; critical thinking, scepticism and faith; types of knowledge; evidence, demonstration, persuasion; critical thinking, logic and valid arguments; critical thinking and creative thinking; overcoming barriers to critical thinking, assumptions, context, biases; fallacies of presumption; fallacies of irrelevance; fallacies of ambiguity; critical thinking, rhetoric and critical writing; critical thinking and decision making

 

HED 1102: Communication Skills 1

 

Purpose of the Course: To prepare the student for both working and learning environments, in terms of gaining the best from reading, listening and producing the most appropriate form of writing. To stimulate awareness correct grammatical form and the need for a disciplined approach to study. To instil confidence. To diagnose individual communication problems

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Record, interpret and present information in oral, written and diagrammatic forms
  2. Use simple memory aids as part of the learning programme
  3. Use different sources for collection and selection of information

Course Content

Communication: definition, elements, process, purposes, qualities, and barriers. Categories of communication: Oral communication: public speaking. Listening skills: efficient listening, barriers, and listening to lectures. Grammar: syntactic and semantic skills, vocabulary building. Writing skills: essay and APA referencing and being able to write general content like that on BFSM and others. Sources of information and evaluation of information sources, library, observation, and experiments. Visual communication: chalkboard, transparencies, stencils, slides, television, and films. Online communication: language use and etiquette

 

HED 1202: Communication Skills 2

 

Purpose of the Course: To prepare the student for both working and learning environments, in terms of gaining the best from reading, listening and producing the most appropriate form of business writing.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Record, interpret and present information in oral, written and diagrammatic forms
  2. Use simple memory aids as part of the learning programme
  3. Use different sources for collection selection and presentation of information

Course Content

Reading skills: critical and efficient reading, barriers, skimming, scanning, and study reading. Persuasive communication. Intercultural communication: power distance, gender and communication. Writing skills I:  Academic writing: term papers and academic reports. 2. Public communication: public relations, and advertising. Organisational Communication. Writing Skills II:  Business writing: correspondence, reports, CVs. Interviews, conducting and participating in committee meetings.

 

YEAR 2


HED 1201: Philosophical Anthropology

 

Course Purpose: to develop knowledge and understanding of the human person and apply this to real life

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the students should be able to:

  1. Explain the nature and dignity of the human person and its application in daily life.
  2. Identify  the various sources of their own activity
  3. Understand the meaning and power of human freedom and how to use it well.
  4. Examine various interpersonal relationships and respect for human sexuality.

Course Content

Nature, object and method of philosophical anthropology; characteristics of sensitive life; external and internal senses; nature and object of the intellect and will; human affectivity; freedom ; concept of the person; the human soul; nature and origin; human sexuality; person, nature and culture; elements of human culture; work; recreation; the temporal dimension of an individual.

 

HED 2103: Introduction to Development studies

 

Purpose of the Course: To enable students to understand the true meaning of development and acquire knowledge and skills that will enable them to serve humanity at all levels in the most meaningful ways.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

The student should:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the different theoretical perspectives within the interdisciplinary field of Development studies
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of development challenges; evaluate and devise solutions to development challenges by applying the knowledge and skills learnt
  3. Analyze and assess the impact of globalization on African cultures and values
  4. Critically assess contemporary policy prescriptions for national, regional and international development.

Course Content

The concept of development and underdevelopment; economic and human development approach; theories of development; assets of development;

 

The dignity of the human person and development; application of the principles of the common good; impact of feminism: gender perspective and gender ideology; nature of poverty and its root causes; trends of urbanization and its impact; the impact of information technology on social life; demographic change and its impact on development; responses to development challenges at national, regional and international levels; impact of globalization on African culture and values.

 

HHE 2105: Introduction to Philosophy

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

The expected outcome of Introduction to Philosophy is:

  1. Demonstrate reasoning skills
  2. Analyze reality
  3. Explain the importance of reality over knowledge and of value over facts

Course Content

Meaning and concept of philosophy in history;  its method and major areas of enquiry such as the world, existence, truth, the afterlife, God, good and bad actions, free will and personal identity;

The nature of knowledge, etc. Core areas of academic philosophy: 1) Metaphysics and derived fields such as Natural Theology, Philosophy of Nature, Philosophical Anthropology, Aesthetics 2) Logic and derived fields such as Theory of Knowledge, The Philosophies of Science, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of History 3) Ethics and derived fields such as bioethics, business ethics, social and political philosophy 4) History of Philosophy 5) All other areas of Human learning and activity.

 

HHE 2206: World Civilizations I

 

Purpose of the Course: To teach students to appreciate the relevance of historical studies and how the present can only be understood within the context of the past.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course students should:

  1. Value historical studies
  2. Assess how ancient civilizations have shaped the world today.

Course Content

The course explores the origins and development of the early civilizations of Asia and Africa (ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, India, Ghana, Mali, Songay) and the Americas (Mayas, Aztecs and Inca), looking especially at their historical roots, cultural foundations and achievements.  In broad contrast with these early civilizations, the course goes on to examine Western and Islamic civilization and the differing ways in which they are shaping the world today.

HLE 2104: European Foreign Language 1 (French, German)

 

Purpose of the Course: Language 1 is the first in a sequential series of 7 language courses (for Tourism and Hospitality students) and 4 language courses for the others. The course intends to provide students with a basic grounding in French/German so as to enable them to communicate effectively in socio-professional contexts.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of Foreign Language 1 students should be able to:

  1. Conduct presentations in basic French/German.
  2. Converse about basic common place themes such as family, the weather, immediate surrounding e.g. where one lives.
  3. Read and write simple French/ German texts and readers.
  4. Describe activities in the present, future and imperative tenses.
  5. Have some knowledge on French/ German culture, history and politics.

Course Content

Basic vocabulary and structural patterns, with emphasis on developing fundamental reading, writing, listening and speaking skills; special emphasis on reading and writing courses. In the German course they also learn some basic writing rules (e.g. capitalization of the first letter on all German nouns).
 

HLE 2204: European Foreign Language 2 (French, German)

 

Purpose of the Course: Language 2 is a second in a sequential series of 7 language courses. The course intends to provide students with a basic grounding in the language so as to enable them to communicate effectively in socio-professional contexts.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

The course is also part of the preparation of the students for level A1 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students should be able to:

  1. Hold a conversation on commonplace events
  2. Interpret a written informative text and read simple texts in the form of simple readers, articles, short stories, etc.
  3. Prepare simple personal letters, short, simple notes and messages relating to matters of immediate needs.
  4. Write an informative text.
  5. Discuss culture, history and politics.

Course Content

Strengthening language skill foundation; grammar review and vocabulary expansion through extensive use of idiomatic expressions; emphasis on oral and reading proficiency; contrastive analysis of major morphological and syntactic constructions of European languages.


HLE 2103:  Japanese Language 1

 

Purpose of the Course: This course uses Japanese language to introduce Japan, Japanese society and culture in order to expand the learners’ horizons and prepare them to play effective roles as professionals operating on the global stage. As the first of a four-part course Japanese I will introduces the basic vocabulary and structure of the language in its spoken and written form and explains the related cultural and social context.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this course should be able to

  1. Speak, comprehend speech, read and write the Japanese language needed for: first-time interactions such as greetings, self-introductions, introducing other people, explaining and giving information relating to oneself, family, friends, home, hobbies, occupation and simple everyday activities.
  2. Correctly use the associated social and cultural context of various greetings and the language of initial interactions with Japanese.
  3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of Japanese society and culture.

Course Content:

Pronunciation and Writing System (Hiragana and Katakana).Greetings.Self Introduction.Introducing others.Use of the predicate desu.Affirmation and negation.Demonstratives.Counting.Requesting basic information.Describing daily activities, surroundings, family and occupation.Cultural issues relating to elementary language.

 

HLE 2203: Japanese Language 2

 

Purpose of the Course: This course is a follow-up on Japanese I and seeks to deepen the abilities acquired while introducing new skills beyond the elementary level with a wider variety of cultural experiences. Japanese II will deepen understanding of the language in its spoken and written form beyond the elementary level and the related cultural and social context. This course will expand on vocabulary and structural patterns, with emphasis on developing better reading, writing and speaking and listening skills.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this course should be able to

  1. Construct and produce in speech and writing, sentences of average length beyond simple greetings and introductions that are useful in everyday conversation in Japanese to describe objects and situations relating to daily activities.
  2. Write and translate written short passages that use the 92 characters of Japanese kana script, accurately and at moderate speed and fluency.
  3. Interpret Japanese kanji script of about 75 basic characters accurately and fluently.

Course Content

Grammar review and vocabulary expansion.Further skills in Hiragana and Katakana reading and writing.  Kanji script – 75 characters. Further descriptions of daily activities. Giving and asking for reasons. Verb forms. Directional particles.Adjective forms.Interrogatives.Adverbials. Cultural issues in the context of everyday life in Japan.

 

YEAR 3


HED 2101: Principles of Ethics

 

Purpose of the Course: To assist the students to understand and distinguish between good and evil moral actions

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Explain how Principles of Ethics relates to their lives and degree course
  2. Apply ethical principles to explain their understanding of happiness, the good life and how to live it.
  3. Apply the Natural moral law precepts to specific human actions

Course Content

Ethics as a philosophical discipline; its relationship with other fields of knowledge; the person as author of behaviour; theory of the voluntary act; the desire for happiness and the moral life; the moral act; object intentions and circumstances ;virtue; kinds; necessity; habit of good choice; cardinal virtues and specific virtues; the principles of practical knowledge and right reason: the natural moral law; moral responsibility: duties and rights; prudence and moral conscience; moral norms and intrinsically good or evil actions; moral judgment of particular acts.
 

HED 3101: Social and Political Philosophy

 

Purpose of the Course:To deepen students understanding of their social nature, there social responsibility , the social institutions and the role of social interactions at all levels of society

 

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  1. Recognize their social nature, their duties and responsibilities,
  2. Distinguish the different kinds of social institutions: family, intermediate and political societies
  3. Evaluate the importance of fostering personal social virtues at all levels.

Course Content

Political and Social Philosophy, concept and method; person and society; love and virtues as root and development of society; types of societies; the family and the individual; education and society; man, religion and society; work and economy; society and authority; the common good; natural law and positive law; human rights; law and justice, politics and governance; principles of solidarity and subsidiarity; culture and society; the international society.

 

HHE 3107: Great Books I
 

Purpose of the Course: To introduce students to the art of reading for pleasure.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of Great Books I the students will:

  1. Value the art of reading for pleasure.
  2. Discover and explain the human condition better and appreciate other cultures.

Course Content

An examination and analysis of narrative techniques and strategies in a variety of texts ranging from simple to complex narrative forms;  texts from different narrative contexts and cultures will be considered and will include, among others, the works of- Dickens, Shakespeare, C.S.Lewis, CamaraLaye, Orwell, Achebe, Steinbeck, Tagore, NgugiwaThiongo and Soyinka.

 

HHE 3108: East African Societies

 

Purpose of the Course: To give students a comprehensive grasp of the cultural, environmental and political forces that have shaped present-day East African society.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course the student should:

  1. Appraise and assess the cultural and environmental roots that have shaped the present day East African.
  2. Describe the origins of ethnic communities/groups.
  3. Critique pre-colonial socio-economic and political organisations and institutions.

Course Content

Description of the peopling of East Africa. Study on the origins of ethnic communities/group;

pre-colonial socio-economic and political organizations and institutions; conflict of institutions

 

HHE 3207: Great Books II
 

Purpose of Course: To develop the art of critical appreciation of different types of writing.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

The upshot of Great Books II is:

  1. Create a critical appreciation of literature.
  2. Generate write up critiques and reviews on literature.

Course Content

A continuation of Great Books I; introduction to literary study, with emphasis on more critical reading, and learning ways of reading and writing about literature; special attention will be given to shifting notions of culture, problems of language, tradition, commerce and technology; texts are taken from Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe, India, the Middle East, Russia and the Far East.

 

HHE 3210: World Civilizations II

 

Purpose of the Course: The aim of the course is to give students a general background so as to enable them better appreciate trends and happenings in today’s world.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course students should:

  1. Formulate major differences between the 19th century and today’s world.
  2. Explain why and how differences between the 19th century and today’s worldcame about.

Course Content

A general introduction to the forces that have shaped events in the world within the last one hundred years The course stresses the element of causality, or the question why things happen the way they do.

 

HLE 3104: European Foreign Language 3 (French, German)

 

Purpose of the Course: Foreign Language 3 is the third in a sequential series of 7 language courses. The course intends to firmly ground students in the language to enable them communicate effectively and express their opinions. By the end of Language 3 Students should have attained an equivalent of level A1 under the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course students should:

  1. Narrate past events.
  2. Formulate hypotheses in the past and present.
  3. Analyze written texts.
  4. Express their opinion and justify themselves.
  5. Describe in details both orally and in writing.
  6. Ask questions with ease on current events.
  7. Talk about the country’s policies and culture.
  8. Read simple texts in the form of book excerpts and articles, notices, posters, catalogues etc.
  9. Recognize familiar words and very basic phrases concerning oneself, family and surroundings when people speak slowly and clearly.

Course Content

Continuation and enhancement of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in different communicative and culturally specific situations.

 

HLE 3204: European Foreign Language 4 (French, German)

 

Purpose of the Course: Foreign Language 4 is the fourth in a sequential series of 7 language courses. The course intends to ensure students use the language skills acquired to effectively communicate in socio-professional contexts; in this module emphasis will be laid on spoken French.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course students should:

  1. Narrate past events.
  2. Formulate hypotheses in the past and present.
  3. Analyze written texts.
  4. Express their opinion and justify themselves.
  5. Describe in details both orally and in writing.
  6. Ask questions with ease on current events.
  7. Talk about the country’s policies and culture.
  8. Talk about social issues e.g. education and entertainment, employment etc.
  9. Read simple texts in the form of book excerpts and articles, etc.

Course Content

Continuation and enhancement of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in different communicative and culturally specific situations.
 

HLE 3103: Japanese Language 3

 

Purpose of the Course: This course is a follow-up on Japanese Language 1 and 2 and seeks to bring the learners up to a level equivalent to the first-half of level N5 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) administered worldwide by the Japan Foundation.  Japanese Language 3 will deepen understanding of the language in its spoken and written form at a level necessary for communication related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment, school/university environment).

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this course should have the competencies required for level N5 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) administered worldwide by the Japan Foundation and in addition, should be able to

1) Formulate in speech and writing, sentences that are useful in everyday conversation in Japanese to describe situations within the student’s daily experiences. (e.g. basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment, school/university environment)

2) Paraphrase sentences that use all Japanese kana script,

3) Interpret moderately long comprehension passages accurately and at relatively fast speed and fluency.

4) Interpret Japanese kanji script of about 100 basic characters accurately and fluently.

 

Course Content

Present continuous state. Further Kanji.Issuing instructions.Expressions of want and desire. Issuing instructions and making requests. Permissions and prohibitions.“Dictionary form’’ of Japanese.The negative plain form. Cultural issues relevant to foreigners interacting with Japanese society.

 

HLE 3203: Japanese Language 4

 

Purpose of the Course: This course is the final of four parts and seeks to bring the learners up to a level equivalent to the end of level N5 of the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) administered worldwide by the Japan Foundation. It provides a firm basis for developing language skills commonly encountered in work, study, and leisure.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this course should be able to

  1. Formulate in speech and writing, fairly complex patterns of sentences that are useful in conversation in Japanese to describe a wider variety of situations that may arise if the student lived in Japan.
  2. To translate ordinary prose that employs all Japanese Kana as well as kanji script of about 120 basic characters accurately and fluently.

Course Content

Casual speech.Expressing opinions.Indirect and direct quotes. Seeking and confirming agreement. Reading and listening comprehension.Noun modifiers and simple relative clauses.Describing inevitability.Cultural context for higher level interaction with Japanese society for higher studies, business or living in Japan.

 

YEAR 4
 

HED 4101: Professional Ethics /Business Ethics

 

Purpose of the Course:The aim of this course is to equip students with the knowledge of ethics in business and professional life in theory and practice

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students who have completed this unit will be able to:

  1. Explain the characteristics of a good professional
  2. Understand how ethics can improve the workplace.
  3. Identify and articulate ethical issues related to the profession
  4. Appreciate the value of human relations at the work place

Module 1 (Common module):

Necessity of professional ethics in any professional practice; essential characteristics of professional practice: specialized knowledge; commitment to service; ability for decision making; sound judgment: autonomy in decision making; ethics and sound professional judgment; elements of good and ethical decision making: exercise of the cardinal virtues, other human virtues such as magnanimity, confidentiality, trust, responsibility, integrity, honesty, accountability, transparency, objectivity, respectfulness, obedience to the law, and humility; duties, rights and moral responsibility in the work place; humanizing the workplace

 

Module II BCOM . (BUSINESS ETHICS)

 

BCOM

Nature and object of professional ethics; morality and economy; ethical theories and their influence in business (utilitarianism, deontologist, virtue ethics); the purpose of the firm and ethics of management; the responsibility of the firm towards internal stakeholders (employees),  external stakeholders 1 (consumers), and external stakeholders 2 (the state and society); ethical issues at the work place; codes of ethics; corporate social responsibility

 

Module II BBIT (ETHICAL ISSUES IN IT)

Ethical behaviour in the IT profession; intellectual property rights [Napster]; falsifying information and/or the sources of information; pornography and children; games and the gaming industry; pollution and environmental degradation; regulation versus choice; permanent underclass; internet fraud; safety and ergonomics; security and cyber crime issues; ethical issues in the internet; malicious software (viruses); privacy and copying; legal framework for IT in Kenya and CCK

 

Module II CTH STUDENTS (ETHICAL ISSUES IN HOSPITALIY AND TOURISM) INDUSTRY

Conditions of employment and respect; long working hours and labour intensive nature of work; poor wages for untrained lower cadre staff; solid waste disposal, hygiene and cleanliness; wastage of products/ingredients; a variety of employment discrimination issues due to multi-cultural visitors; employee theft or pilferage; false advertising by hotels; vendor honesty; AIDS in food service industry.

 

Module III: All students

HR Issues: Discrimination; Harassment, sexual and otherwise; Nepotism

Issues with Consumers: Conflicts of interest – bribes, privileged information; Customer confidence issues – product safety, truth in advertising, falsifying accounts and payment of taxes (tax evasion and tax avoidance), special fiduciary responsibilities

Employer/Employee rights and duties: Respect for human dignity, honesty, fairness (wages) and trust issues;Use of corporate resources – time, reputation, financial resources, other material resources, providing honest information

Larger Issues; Corporate Governance; The environment and society.

Contact Details

Madaraka Estate
Ole Sangale Road, PO Box 59857,
00200 City Square
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: 0703-034000, 0703-034200

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